The Final Stretch: Bringing it all together

For the past week, and for the upcoming week, I’ve been and will be working on bringing a little of everything that I’ve done with- and learned from -Olympus this summer into one final project. I’m working on turning the raw Python plugins that I created earlier this summer into plugins that can be viewed through they Olympus GUI itself. That will make them the first fully functioning pair of plugins in Olympus, and hopefully an excellent proof of what it can do. For now, I’ve completed the plugins themselves and most of the debugging that went along with them, and now I’m working on actually visualizing their output using the Olympus front end.

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More UI changes

Several mistakes later, I’ve nearly finished the first stage of UI changes. For now, it consists of a series of buttons that you can press to change the colors of the already existent interface. Next, I’m going to be adding the ability for the program to: Save which settings you’ve chosen; Add images as backgrounds for the overall UI; and a slider to change the background color and the text color more dynamically. After that, its on to additional graphing options/graphical representations of data. Because Olympus will be a program which you download onto your root and node servers, instead of one which is run on a central server, these changes will be affected in the file itself, so it should be relatively easy to save them permanently without use of a login screen or password.

More UI changes

Several mistakes later, I’ve nearly finished the first stage of UI changes. For now, it consists of a series of buttons that you can press to change the colors of the already existent interface. Next, I’m going to be adding the ability for the program to: Save which settings you’ve chosen; Add images as backgrounds for the overall UI; and a slider to change the background color and the text color more dynamically. After that, its on to additional graphing options/graphical representations of data. Because Olympus will be a program which you download onto your root and node servers, instead of one which is run on a central server, these changes will be affected in the file itself, so it should be relatively easy to save them permanently without use of a login screen or password.

Vacation Update

Greetings from vacation! I’ve made some more progress on user-customization of the Olympus UI. I’m currently working the bugs out of a few different themes that people can use to better personalize their Olympus experience. Unfortunately, this is probably the last time that I will have internet access before early next week, so the working code will probably go up then. I am also trying to work out a way to actually access the running Olympus front end from here (After all that I said about making it publicly addressable, it’s sitting behind the firewall at my apt. in Troy.) If I can do that, I’ll also be testing some new data visualization code that I’m working on (Line graphs and lines of best fit, woo hoo!)

HTML Learning website!

 

I found this site (which provides tutorials for HTML on all skill levels. It’s really helping me, and anyone who wants to learn should check it out as well.

Creating Secure Connections

One of the main focuses of Olympus is to be able to access any number of computers securely. To do this we will be using a RSA style key-pair to securely send and receive data between client and server. The source server has a list of all of the remote server’s public keys (the pubkeys are also used a unique identifiers to make each computer unique, independent of its IP address). When a new computer is added to the list the new remote computer will send its public key over to the source server. The sys-admin can then use a fingerprint to make sure that the key is correct, thus creating another secure connection. The communication between the web client and the source server will eventually be an ssl connection however for now we are still working out a few bugs with the encryption method and the certificates.